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According to a recent survey, builders are routinely becoming victims of ‘rogue customers’.

A survey of over four hundred tradesmen has found that four out of five workers have had their costs disputed by customers after the work has been completed. Or, that customers have tried to avoid paying all together! One decorator reported that he was left out of pocket after an argument broke out between himself and the homeowner. This resulted in the customer refusing to pay for the work and in turn, the decorator retaliated! Take a look at the full story here.

Alongside disputes over payments, it was also revealed that some tradesmen had even been attacked by the homeowner’s dog when working on a domestic project. One guy even got trapped on the roof after being bitten!

With biting dogs, and trying to bash down the prices, it doesn’t appear that it could get much worse for tradesmen. When in fact, it can. According to the survey, 27% of tradesmen stated that they were having to work in poor conditions. And another 26% revealed that they were made uncomfortable by a customer’s flirting.

The managing director of AXA, the company who completed the study, stated: “we live in a society which tends to look down on skilled manual work in general, often undervaluing the knowledge, judgement and craftsmanship it involves.”

“It’s hard to imagine someone in a white-collar role encountering such high levels of harassment or casual disrespect.”

“People are quite happy to argue a builder’s fee down once he’s finished work, but would they do the same to a dentist, solicitor or architect?”

But that’s not all. Tradesmen regularly have to deal with all sorts of issues when it comes to their customers such as unrealistic expectations, hovering over them whilst they work, and the massive misuse of the term “emergency”. Take a look at the most common mistakes customers make here. Do you agree with these?

So what do you think? Do you have to deal with rogue customers? Let us know in the comments below.

Source: www.builderandengineer.co.uk

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