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Apparently, a design firm from New York has proposed the idea of suspending a skyscraper from an asteroid!

It would be classed as “the world’s tallest building ever”, and apparently hang by cables that are attached to a repositioned asteroid. Daily, it would then trace the planet’s surface in a figure eight pattern, swinging between the northern and southern hemisphere’s, returning to the same point every twenty-four hours.

The construction would be powered by solar panels and would use recycled water. The lower floors would also be designed for business purposes. Alongside this, sleeping areas would be reserved around two-thirds of the way up the building.

One thing that hasn’t been made clear though is how people would get on and off the building. A very vital factor. However, there are indications that people may have to parachute down.

When at the highest points though, people would apparently be able to take advantage of extra sunlight. This would only be around forty-five minutes worth though. Plus, at elevations of around 32,000 metres, they would have to wear space suits outside anyway due to their being a near vacuum, and temperatures around -40°C.

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With these conditions, it begs the question: why would anyone want to do this?

Well, the plans state: “harnessing the power of planetary design thinking, it taps into the desire for extreme height, seclusion and constant mobility.”

“If the recent boom in residential towers proves that sales price per square foot rises with floor elevation, the Analemma Tower will command record prices, justifying its high cost of construction.”

This isn’t the only out of this world construction work in the pipeline either. One billionaire is planning on building a self-sustaining city on Mars. Take a look at the full report here.

So what do you think of this? Would you want to be part of this construction project? Let us know in the comments below.

Source: www.scottishconstructionnow.com

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