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According to a recent report, robots are set to take the jobs of over six hundred thousand builders in the UK!

The report revealed that nearly one in three construction roles could be completely wiped out over the next twenty years. Instead, 600,000 of the 2.2 million jobs in the industry could become automated. The research, conducted by Mace, an engineering company based in London, has termed this the ‘fourth industrial revolution’.

When looking at the trades, it was found that bricklayers would be hit the hardest. Shockingly, numbers in this trade are estimated to fall from 73,000 to 4,300. Alongside this, by 2040, there will also be just 15,500 interior fitters and carpenters. This is significantly less than the 260,000 currently working within the trade.

With painters also dropping from 110,000 to just 6,500, increased automation and robots are set to raise safety standards and speed up construction projects. According to Mace, despite a loss of trade jobs, new roles will be created such as computer programmers.

Mace added: “Everyone acknowledges the current skills shortages need to be addressed.”

“Our research highlights the opportunities offered by the digital revolution.”

“Advancements in robotics and automated manufacturing, data analytics and virtual reality are radically transforming the sector and indeed the whole economy.”

“Yet all is not lost.”

“The fourth industrial revolution could improve productivity levels in construction, increase the number of highly skilled jobs and transform the way that we as a country deliver some of the biggest and most complex infrastructure projects of the future.”

The report concluded: ‘The building sector needs to adapt to these major changes or will face a crisis.’

In recent years, advancements have been made with technology in the industry. One of which is through bricklaying robots. According to reports, this robot can lay bricks six times faster than the average bricklayer. Take a look at the robot in action here.

Sources: www.dailymail.co.uk, www.express.co.uk

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